Monday, September 22, 2014

Make 'em count!


Make every word count.

Don’t overwrite. Don’t use words to impress or just because you like how they sound.

Some older novels used page after page to describe scenes. They call it purple prose. Personally, I don’t want to buy a novel containing 200 pages of useless information.

Don’t give your readers a reason to skim.

Brandilyn Collins writes suspense. I don’t skim anything in her books. Even when she is describing scenes or how someone looks, there are always clues about the characters or about what may happen.

This is the first paragraphs of her book, Violet Dawn.
“Paige Williams harbored a restless kinship with the living dead. Sleep, that nurturing, blessed state of subconsciousness, eluded her again this night. Almost 2:00 a.m., and rather than slumbering bliss, old memories nibbled at her like ragged-toothed wraiths.
With a defeated sigh she rose from the bed.
Wrapped in a large towel, she moved through the darkened house, bare feet faintly scuffling across worn wood floors. Out of her room and down a short hall, passing the second bedroom—barren and needing to be filled—and the one bathroom, into the small kitchen.”

Brandilyn’s scene gives hints about Paige, describes the surroundings to give you bearings but is not overbearing.

No word is wasted, they all have a purpose. Learn to write without wasted words.

DiAnn Mills writes, “A good writer knows that cutting the flab adds muscle and reduces the fat in his manuscript.”

Write for quality, not quantity.








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